Vasiliy Lomachenko

Weightclass: Featherweight

  • 10wins

  • 1losses

  • 0draws

  • 7kos

AGE:
29
Birthplace:
Bilhorod-Dnistrovskyi, Ukraine
Height:
5’6”
reach:
65"
Managers:
Egis Klimas (Boxing Writers Association of America’s “Manager of the Year” in 2016 and 2017)
Trainers:
Anatoly Lomachenko (father; Boxing Writers Association of America’s “2017 Trainer of the Year)

Vasiliy "Hi-Tech" Lomachenko

At the age of 29, Vasiliy is a four-year pro. A two-division world champion, he won the WBO featherweight world title in his third pro fight in June, 2014, and made three successful title defenses, then vacated the title to move up in weight. He won the WBO junior lightweight world title in June, 2016, and has now made four successful title defenses.

He is a very special talent.

Vasiliy’s goal as a professional is simple – to be the best boxer in the world – and after only four years and 11 pro fights, he has already reached elite status. He is universally considered to be one of the best at any weight in the ring today, and many already consider him to be the best.

The Boxing Writers Association of America voted Vasily the “2017 Fighter of the Year.” Vasily’s father, Anatoly Lomachenko, was voted “2017 Trainer of the Year,” and manager Egis Klimas was voted “2017 Manager of the Year,” the second consecutive year he has won the award.

BWAA President Joseph Santoliquito wrote: The Boxing Writers Association of America is proud to announce that its Sugar Ray Robinson 2017 Fighter of the Year is Vasily “Hi-Tech” Lomachenko, who made history in becoming the first Ukrainian to earn that distinction in the 80-year history of the award.

Lomachenko earned the BWAA’s coveted prize by beating solid contenders Jason Sosa and Miguel Marriaga in 2017, then closing the year by making two-time Olympic gold medalist Guillermo Rigondeaux quit after six rounds.

Lomachenko’s selection is the crowning moment for Team Lomachenko, which won a rare BWAA triple crown by winning the BWAA’s fighter, trainer and manager of the year awards for 2017. The last trio to complete the BWAA’s triple crown was in 1992….

The second winner of Team Lomachenko’s BWAA triple crown is Loma’s father, Anatoly Lomachenko, who was voted the BWAA’s 2017 Eddie Futch Trainer of the Year.

For the second-straight year and completing Team Lomachenko trifecta is the BWAA’s 2017 Cus D’Amato Manager of the Year, Egis Klimas…. [End Santoliquito item]

The way Vasily views potential opponents is also very simple. He wants to fight the best opposition and to him, that means all of the other world title-holders. If they’re not available or willing to fight, he wants to fight the highest-ranked contenders.

In his three fights in 2017, Vasily showed a variety of styles. Against the aggressive Jason Sosa on April 8, he used lateral movement – Vasily was practically untouchable defensively, and wore down Sosa with sharp leads and counters from unexpected angles, punches Sosa could not see coming or anticipate. Sosa was beaten down, round by round, and quit in his corner after the ninth round.

On August 5 in Los Angeles, Vasily was the aggressor against Miguel Marriaga – he constantly backed up Marriaga, wore him down with a relentless two-handed attack, and Marriaga quit in his corner after the seventh round.

In his last fight on December 9th in New York, Vasily used a combination of those tactics against previously undefeated Guillermo Rigondeaux. He fought aggressively against the natural counterpuncher, but also mixed in lateral movement and angles with the pressure to completely neutralize the Cuban and dominate the fight. Rigondeaux claimed he injured his left hand, and quit in his corner after the sixth round.

It was Vasily’s 10th consecutive world title fight and seventh consecutive knockout win.

ESPN.com’s Dan Rafael wrote [excerpts]: Junior lightweight world champion Vasily Lomachenko, the new No. 1 fighter in the world, pound-for-pound, according to our ESPN panel vote of boxing experts, cemented his status with a surprisingly easy sixth-round stoppage of Guillermo Rigondeaux at the sold-out Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York.

It was a typically brilliant performance from Lomachenko, already a two-division world titleholder in only 11 pro fights. He made Rigondeaux, who had been ranked on the pound-for-pound list and dominant in his own right, meekly quit on his stool after the sixth round.

Lauded by many as a pound-for-pound talent, Rigondeaux moved up two weight classes for the first-ever showdown between two-time Olympic gold medalists but had no answers for anything – and then claimed a broken left hand. It turned out it was merely bruised, an unacceptable reason for a supposed prize fighter to quit. Lomachenko more likely broke his spirit by playing with him so easily to hand him his first defeat since a 2003 amateur bout.

Rigondeaux was hopeless and bewildered, unable to do anything with the superior Lomachenko, a professional for only four years who now counts several excellent victories on his record, including Rigondeaux, Nicholas Walters, Roman “Rocky” Martinez and Gary Russell Jr.

Lomachenko toyed with them all and has now made his last four opponents (Rigondeaux, Miguel Marriaga, Jason Sosa and Walters) quit, bringing about a change in nickname from “High-Tech” to “No Mas ‘Chenko.”

He is a supremely talented fighter and at 29 just seems to be entering his prime.

He is fun to watch. He has begun to open up and show some personality, and he has displayed ever-improving English in his interviews.

And he will continue to get tremendous exposure by fighting on ESPN as part of Top Rank’s long-term deal with the network. [End Rafael item]

In his ringside report, Rafael wrote [excerpts]: Lomachenko did as he pleased until Rigondeaux quit on his stool after the sixth round of what had been an utterly one-sided fight before a sellout crowd of 5,102 at the Theater at Madison Square Garden.

Lomachenko easily won the much-anticipated fight between two of the world’s elite pound-for-pound fighters. Rigondeaux showed almost nothing as Lomachenko toyed with him from the outset.

The fight began with Lomachenko and Rigondeaux trying to establish their jabs, but it was Lomachenko setting the tone with his activity level, although Rigondeaux landed a few body shots.

When Rigondeaux tried to hold in the second round, Lomachenko forcefully broke away and nailed him, and then landed a solid right hand moments later. It was a big round for Lomachenko, who rattled Rigondeaux and refused to allow him to tie him up. Rigondeaux continued to hold in the third round, drawing a forceful break by referee Steve Willis.

Lomachenko continued to pepper Rigondeaux with shots in the fourth round. In the fifth round, when Rigondeaux held yet again, Willis warned him not to keep doing it.

Willis finally took a point from Rigondeaux for holding in the sixth round, drawing cheers from the crowd and putting Rigondeaux into an even deeper hole. When the round was over, Rigondeaux quit.

Rigondeaux could not hang with Lomachenko. After the sixth round, Lomachenko was ahead 60-53, 59-54 and 59-54 on the scorecards. According to CompuBox punch statistics, Rigondeaux never landed more than three punches in a round. [End Rafael item]

After the fight, Hall of Fame promoter Bob Arum told the ringside media, “The only thing I can say is you guys are seeing something really special. The body of work from this kid is something that is virtually incredible. I’ve never seen anything like this – I never have.

“He gets these guys, he frustrates them, it looks like he’s going to knock them out and they quit because they can’t answer back. This is something really unique. Rigondeaux goes in with Lomachenko, and he is totally bewildered. He can’t hit him with anything.

“What I sense is – I am seeing something so special it will have to be part of history. I’ve been around great fighters, Leonard, Hagler, Floyd, Pacquiao. I’ve never seen a fighter like this, even Ali.”

Vasily wanted to challenge for a world title in his pro debut but when that was not possible, he did challenge for one, unsuccessfully, in his second fight. He won a world title in his third fight in June, 2014 – only eight months after his debut – which tied the record for winning a world title with the fewest fights. Saensak Muangsurin of Thailand also won a junior welterweight world title in his third fight in 1975.

Vasily made history again by becoming the first fighter to win world titles in two weight divisions in only seven fights. The previous record was eight, held by 23-year-old Naoya Inoue of Japan, who won the WBC light flyweight title (108 pounds) in his sixth fight in April, 2014, made a successful defense five months later in September, then won the WBO junior bantamweight title (115 pounds) in his eighth fight three months after that in December, 2014.

Vasily said through an interpreter, “I like to know every single detail about my opponent before we fight. It doesn’t matter if my opponent is strong, it doesn’t matter if my opponent is not strong – I always want to know every detail. I study every opponent very closely.”

Regarding his nickname, Vasily said, “I think I got it during the Olympics. I was training somewhere and one of the reporters was talking about high technology, and he said that I was a ‘high tech’ boxer.”

AMATEUR, PERSONAL BACKGROUND: Vasily said through an interpreter, “I was born and raised in Bilhorod-Dnistrovskyi, Ukraine. I have one sister. She’s a gymnast. My father is a boxing trainer – he was also a schoolteacher – and my mother is a gymnastics trainer, so my whole family is involved in sports. My father was an amateur boxer when he was young.

“I can’t even remember how old I was when I first started boxing, but I was very, very young. When I was born, I think they took me straight from the hospital to the gym.

“I had 396 amateur fights, with one loss.

“I eat with my right hand, I write with my right hand, but I fight left-handed. When I first started, my father trained me and put me in the left-handed stance.

“I’m married. My wife’s name is Elena (pr. yel-LAY-na) and we have two children. My son’s name is Anatoly. He was five years old on November 17, 2016. Our daughter was born on August 26, 2012. Her name is Victoria. I named her that for the victory – she was born on the same day I signed with Top Rank.”…

ESPN.com’s Mark Kriegel wrote [Dec. 6, 2017 – excerpts]: Vasily was just three days old when his father, a physical education teacher and boxing coach, put his hands in a pair of gloves. It’s not that Vasiliy can’t remember the first time he went to a gym. He doesn’t remember not being in a gym.

Anatoly thought deeply about athletic performance, ideas eventually crystalizing into convictions. It was important for Vasily to maintain good grades, as an educated body was governed by an educated mind, intellectually stimulated and capable of decision-making under stress. Anatoly never believed in the kind of early specialization so prevalent today. Even as he boxed, Vasily also played soccer and hockey and wrestled.

At 10, he began traditional Ukrainian folk dance.

Vasiliy danced two hours every day after school. Then he’d go home for a bite and head to the gym. That was his routine, almost four years in pantaloons. But it endowed him with what he has today, the finest footwork in boxing.

Unlike most fighters, Vasily’s was a balanced, harmonious youth. He read a Russian translation of “Tom Sawyer” in grade school. He learned to hunt for pheasant and duck and to fish for carp. [End Kriegel item]

Since boxing was first included in the modern Olympic Games in 1904, only 12 boxers have won two gold medals each: Ariel Hernandez, Angel Herrera, Mario Kindelan, Oliver Kirk, Jerzy Kulej, Boris Lagutin, Vasily Lomachenko, Harry Mallin, Guillermo Rigondeaux, Oleg Saitov, Zou Shiming, and Hector Vinent…three boxers have won three Olympic gold medals each: László Papp, Felix Savon and Teófilo Stevenson…all of the fighters won their gold medals in consecutive Olympics except Kirk, who won both the bantamweight and featherweight titles in 1904 with only one fight in each division…

fight history

  • 2017

    Fight by Fight – 2017 – 4TH WBO JL WORLD TITLE DEFENSE – in his last fight on 12-9-17 in New York, NY, he won by TKO (6th round) against previously undefeated left-handed WBA super bantamweight world champion Guillermo Rigondeaux (17-0): the bout headlined in The Theater at Madison Square Garden – it drew a capacity crowd of 5,102, and Vasily dominated the fight; after a feel-out 1st round, Vasily pressed forward and kept Rigondeaux off-balance with lateral movement – he scored with sharp combinations, rocked Rigondeaux several times, and was practically untouchable defensively; Rigondeaux’ frustration began to show early – he would duck almost to the canvas to avoid punches at times, and clinched repeatedly throughout the fight; Rigondeaux was penalized one point for holding in the 6th round and did not continue after the round, claiming an injured left hand; after six rounds, Vasily led by scores of 60-53, 59-54, 59-54…

    3RD WBO JL WORLD TITLE DEFENSE – on 8-5-17 in Los Angeles, CA, he won by TKO (7th round) against Miguel Marriaga (25-2): the bout headlined at Microsoft Theater – it drew a crowd of 4,102, and Vasily dominated the fight; he pressed forward, out-worked Marriaga, and consistently landed the harder punches; he scored a knockdown with a left hand in the 3rd round, but was over his left eye by a clash of heads in the 4th; Vasily rocked Marriaga repeatedly in the following rounds, then scored another knockdown with a left hand late in the 7th round – Marriaga’s corner threw in the towel, the bell rang, and the referee stopped the fight at 3:00; after seven rounds, Vasily led by scores of 70-61, 70-61, 69-62…

    2ND WBO JL WORLD TITLE DEFENSE – on 4-8-17 in Oxon Hill, MD he won by TKO (9th round) against former WBA super featherweight champion Jason Sosa (20-1-4): the bout headlined at MGM National Harbor, and Vasily dominated the fight; he consistently out-boxed and out-worked Sosa, and landed the harder punches; Sosa gave a determined effort and landed a few right hands, but could not build any momentum; Vasily rocked him with a series of punches in the 5th round, then staggered him with a series of punches in 7th; the fight became more one-sided as the rounds progressed, and Sosa’s corner stopped the fight after the 9th round; after nine rounds, Vasily led by scores of 89-82, 89-82, 90-81…

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  • 2016

    1ST WBO JL WORLD TITLE DEFENSE – on 11-26-16 in Las Vegas, NV, he won by TKO (7th round) against previously undefeated former WBA featherweight champion Nicholas Walters (26-0-1): the bout headlined at the Cosmopolitan, and Vasyl dominated the fight; he kept Walters off-balance with lateral movement and consistently outboxed him; he also landed the harder punches, steadily wore down Walters, and was almost untouchable defensively; Vasyl stepped up his pace as the rounds progressed – he rocked Walters repeatedly in the 7th round and staggered him with a left hand, and Walters did not continue after the round; after seven rounds, Vasyl led by scores of 69-64, 69-64, 70-63.

    WON WBO JL WORLD TITLE – on 6-11-16 in New York, NY, he won by knockout (5th round) against defending champion Roman Martinez (29-2-3): the bout headlined in The Theater at Madison Square Garden, and drew a crowd of 4,545; Vasyl dominated the fight – he keot Martinez off-balance with movement and consistently outboxed and outworked him; he also landed the harder punches, and rocked Martinez several times; Vasyl scored a devastating knockdown with a left uppercut-right hook combination in the 5th round that dropped Martinez flat on his back, and he was counted out at 1:09; after four rounds, Vasyl led by shutout scores of 40-36 on all three scorecards.

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  • 2015

    On 11-7-15 in Las Vegas, NV, he won by knockout (10th round) against Romulo Koasicha (25-4): the bout was co-featured with the Timothy Bradley Jr.-Brandon Rios main event, and Vasyl dominated the fight; Koasicha pressed forward and gave a good effort, but Vasyl outboxed and outworked him, and consistently landed the harder punches; Vasyl stepped up his pace in the middle rounds, rocked Koasicha repeatedly, and wore him down; he scored a knockdown with a left hand to the body in the 10th round, and Koasicha was counted out at 2:35; after nine rounds, Vasyl led by shutout scores of 90-81 on all three scorecards.

    2ND WBO F WORLD TITLE DEFENSE – on 5-2-15 in Las Vegas he won by knockout (9th round) against Gamalier Rodriguez (25-2-3): the bout was one of the co-features with the Floyd Mayweather Jr.-Manny Pacquiao main event, and Vasyl dominated the fight; he consistently outboxed and outworked Rodriguez, and landed the sharper punches; Rodriguez was penalized one point for low blows in the 5th round, and Vasyl scored a knockdown with a series of punches in the 7th; Rodriguez was penalized another point for low blows in the 8th round; Vasyl scored a knockdown with a right hook in the 9th, and Rodriguez was counted out at 0:50; after eight rounds, Vasyl led by scores of 79-70, 78-71, 80-69.

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